Jeffreys Bay
Records galore for local swimmers at Cape Point

Two local swimmers, Kendal Wright and Brenton Williams recently took on the challenge of swimming around Cape Point, one of the most notorious open water swims in the world.

Cape Point is one of the most dangerous swims in the world

Cape Point is one of the most dangerous swims in the world

They successfully finished the swim with Wright becoming the youngest swimmer to ever round the Cape of Storms, with Williams setting a world record for being the first swimmer to ever round the Point using just the butterfly stroke – regarded as the most difficult swim stroke of them all.

The swim was on behalf of the Little Fighters Cancer Trust and 13 swimmers managed to complete the swim, overcoming seriously cold water, heavy fog and then headwinds.

They started on Diaz Beach, where the water was a very chilly 12 C and had to swim along the coast towards Cape Point before entering False Bay.

A thick fog greeted the swimmers, making it difficult to even see their support boats, let alone where they were swimming.

“The water warmed up to 13/14C in False Bay but we hardly noticed that as the fog descended upon us, taking away all visibility,” said Williams.

“We were also buzzed by juvenile seals as we entered False Bay but luckily they left us alone after a while.

The fog then lifted and for about 15 minutes the swim was enjoyable, then a strong headwind kicked in, making the last 4 – 5 km of the 8.5km swim really difficult.

It took nearly an hour to finish the last kilometre and we were very happy to put our feet down on land at Buffels Bay,” added Williams.

Only around 40 swimmers have ever completed a Cape Point swim, compared to 700 – 800 who have completed Robben Island.

Kendal Wright and Brenton Williams swimming in False Bay after rounding Cape Point. Photo: Clive Wright

Kendal Wright and Brenton Williams swimming in False Bay after rounding Cape Point. Photo: Clive Wright

“It’s a really challenging swim as we had to wait for good conditions to be able to swim. Too much swell and it would have been impossible to get out at Diaz Beach and anything below 12 C water temperature would have seen a few swimmers get hyperthermia,” added Williams.

All the swimmers swam according to Channel Rules, which meant they could only wear speedo type costumes, goggles and a swim cap.

Funds raised through the swim went to the Little Fighters Cancer Trust, who look after  kids with cancer.

Donations can be made via www.swimforhope.co.za’s donation’s page, or directly to the Little Fighters Cancer Trust.

Corporate donations receive full Section 18A and BBEEE benefits. For more information, please contact Mandie Erasmus directly on 073 729 6155 or mandie@littlefighters.org.za

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